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What to do for trick-or-treaters???

???  It's almost Halloween time and I was wondering if any other vegans pass out candy or treats.  Hubby and I don't want to be party poopers, but also don't want to give children gross, horrible things like bone-char processed sugar, dairy, and gelatin.  We thought about organic fresh fruit, but it seems like many parents want items that are individually packaged and sealed so homemade baked goods are out.  Here are a couple of ideas we've considered...Any suggestions would be wonderful.

1.  Packaged individual-sized vegan cookies or crackers
2.  Organic Juice boxes
3.  Sample sized packages of vegan gummy bear multivitamins (this would probably get our house paint-balled, though)

What about little boxes of Raisins....most kids like them

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Last year we ran out of candy so I just grabbed anything little in the pantry like juice boxes and granola bars and they were a huge hit, even with the teens!  This year we are doing non food treats, mini bubbles, bouncy super balls, pencils, mini playdough and little pads of paper with TorT themes to them.

I also echo the idea that although it is often made with the best intentions, I would not let my kids take home made treats from anyone other than those families that we were very close to.  It sounds crazy, but I'd rather be safe than sorry.

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These are all really great, ideas. Thank you so much!

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It surprises me that people are saying that kids avoid the houses giving out fruit.  I loved it when I got an apple or box of raisins. 

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My mom always said fruit was injected with poison or things. I wasn't allowed to have any, or baked things. Sadly creepers ruin fun things like that. (and i have gotten things that were actually drugged or messed with, so its scaryyy.)

I love non candy things.
One year i gave out books and toys (and candy to those that were lamebutts and didnt want books). People LOVED my house. (i was in charge of trick or treaters because my mother does not like sitting by the door all night) I'm sure some kids thought our house was super lame, but whatev.

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now and laters, skittles (make sure they r gelatin free), sweet tarts, some laffy taffy is vegan, lollipops

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Yeah, we weren't allowed fruit or anything home-made unless my mother knew the person specifically. She said that she wasn't going to let her kids die over one Halloween treat when there were so many others available.

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My kids were delighted some years by folks giving away second-hand kid's books or small toys.  With that in mind, I kept some of the small but good child- trinkets my 13 yo dd was getting recently rid of, which I knew Goodwill would not accept, and saved them to hand out this year for Halloween.  Kids can pick what they want and not get cavities etc from us, and we get a clean house.  Win win.

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oh ya i forgot airheads! yummy :)

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It surprises me that people are saying that kids avoid the houses giving out fruit.  I loved it when I got an apple or box of raisins. 

There was a big scare during my trick-or-treating days after a razor blade was found in an apple. Not many parents or kiddies wanted apples after that.

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i would never let my child eat anything that looked homemade or not in a wrapper that is really unsafe i think it's best to give trick or treaters something wrapped

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When they come up and go "TRICK OR TREAT?!"

Just be like, "TRICK!" and hand them party poppers. Or gross toys, like those rubber severed fingers or bouncy eyeballs. Or rubber newts. Or those rubber snakes that are really springy so it takes them a second to realise they aren't REALLY going to die of snake venom.

Possibly I'm just mean and trying to make up for how often I got the shit scared out of me when I was trick-or-treating.

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clif bar makes a kids' bar and they released halloween themed bars this year. some mainstream candies that are vegan are mambas and dots. i know dots used to make "fun-sized" boxes when i was a kid.

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I remember being young and getting McDonalds' toys for Halloween. It was at the house of these two older women who would always go to McDs and get kids meals because they couldn't eat a whole adult meal. So they saved the toys and gave them out, still wrapped, at Halloween. I still have one of the mini Beanie Babies.

Also: I think we're doing Skittles and Play Dough this year. And some non-vegan chocolate items possibly. We got a coupon in the paper for Sweetarts, and I think they're vegan.

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Skittles aren't vegetarian!

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The new ones are gelatin free! The mini bags at my Target are.

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There was a big scare during my trick-or-treating days after a razor blade was found in an apple. Not many parents or kiddies wanted apples after that.

Just wanted to share the statistical realities of this (from Snopes) http://www.snopes.com/horrors/mayhem/needles.asp . (edited by me for brevity)
Not that I don't advocate prudence in inspecting Halloween Candy, but one should be aware of the rarity of this.

" Professor Joel Best reported that he's been able to track about eighty cases of sharp objects in food incidents since 1959, and almost all were hoaxes. Only about ten culminated in even minor injury, and in the worst case, a woman required a few stitches.
-snip-
An incident that broke with this expected pattern occurred in Minneapolis in 2000, when 49-year-old James Joseph Smith was charged with one count of adulterating a substance with intent to cause death, harm or illness after it was determined he'd put needles in Snickers bars and handed them out to children on Halloween. A 14-year-old boy was pricked by a needle hidden in a bar he'd bitten into, but no one required medical attention.
-snip-
As author Jack Santino noted in his history of Halloween, "pins and needles" rumors began to supplant "poisoned candy" rumors in the mid-1960s, and nearly all such reports of such rumors proved to be hoaxes:
Beginning in 1967 the focus of the legend shifted dramatically from poison to razors and sharp objects hidden in apples. The emergence of the razor blade motif remains to be studied, but it apparently spread rapidly in several areas of the eastern seaboard and Canada: The New York Times reported thirteen cases from isolated communities in New Jersey and noted "several" others in Ottawa and
Toronto. Outrage was so strong in New Jersey that the state legislature passed a law shortly before Halloween 1968 mandating prison terms for those caught boobytrapping apples. This did not forestall the discovery of thirteen more apples with razor blades that year in five New Jersey counties.
-snip-
Halloween of 1982 was the year it all went crazy. That year saw a number of tragic and random non-Halloween poisonings of both foodstuffs and medicines, including the Tylenol poisonings that killed seven people. Although the "crazed madman tampering with kids' Halloween treats" had been an established bogeyman for at least the previous fifteen years (I recall in the late 1960s my mother chopping up every apple I brought home from trick-or-treating and then making pies from them), it was in the aftermath of the Tylenol poisonings that a sudden spate of Halloween tampering reports erupted. It's as if the murder of those seven unfortunate people opened a forbidden door and now others were free to experiment with playing God, to dispense either life or death as the whim struck them.

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Yep Skittles became vegan this year by becoming gelatin free!!!

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100 calorie bags of microwave popcorn worked out really well last year. We also had mini-boxes of raisins, individually-wrapped prunes, 100 calorie almond packs...Mmm... can't remember what else. The popcorn was visibly the winner per kids' reactions. Double-plus--- all of these are whole foods!

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Hey, great Skittle news!

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