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Help! Im going to China and I dont know what to eat!

Alright so I am going to china with a few students and my sister during April this year. My sister and I are really really excited but the only thing I am kinda worried about is what I am going to eat. I know meat should be pretty avoidable, but Im kinda worried about eggs and milk. Especially egg.

So I was wondering if you guys had any suggestions as to what to bring. Right now I am planning on lots of Cliff Bars and maybe some Raw Revolution stuff (although I have never tried it.)

And has anyone ever tried that primal strip stuff or any other vegan beef jerky type stuff

any help would be greatly appreciated

thanks!

Jake xvx

Primal strips are really yummy! I prefer the soy over seitan. Hickory and Texas BBQ are my faves.
If you'll have a microwave then theres plenty of soups, noodle bowls, rice bowls and things that you just add water to and microwave.

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It's China.  Aren't rice and tofu readily available there?

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It's China.  Aren't rice and tofu readily available there?

I hope that's a true stereotype. If it is I will be so happy. For once the omnivores wont know what to eat!

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Where will you be in China? I spent a few weeks in China a few years back. I was with a big group, so I didn't find myself needing to search for my own food a lot. But here are my suggestions:

Honestly, I think that meat flavoring in things would be something to be concerned about. I've heard, though, that searching for Buhddist restaurants is helpful in terms of finding truly vegetarian meals.

Some of the foods I had for breakfast were great and vegetarian--steamed buns with red beans (be careful you don't accidentally get buns with meat in them), and congee (a rice dish that I would top with peanuts or some sort of greens--I can't remember).

I never ventured out for noodle dishes to know whether they would have eggs.

One of the places I was (Tianjin?) had this fried dough as a local specialty that was vegan and yummy.

Also, I had some great meat analogue dishes, especially in Shanghai! (I think that this was because we were with a big group, though--lots of banquets!)

I also vaguely remember hitting up a hypermarket-type place for different foods.

Definitely get someone to write down, in Mandarin, "I am vegetarian; I do not eat meat, eggs, or milk" or something like that. (A sociology professor I had at the time offered to do that and I wish I had taken her up on the offer; thankfully I was always around people who spoke Mandarin)

As far as things to travel with--see the meatless soy review for suggestions about Primal Strips. We all have our favorites (I prefer the seitan over the soy myself), so the only way to know is to try for yourself. I've traveled quite a bit internationally and always take a supply of clif bars or other similar bars.

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It's China.  Aren't rice and tofu readily available there?

I hope that's a true stereotype. If it is I will be so happy. For once the omnivores wont know what to eat!

It seems to be true for my co-workers who moved here from China.  And for Taoist potlucks.

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maybe you could get one of those vegan passports from foodfight.com so you can just point and show it to your food server so they understand your situation.  i third the idea of clif bars and primal strips.. but remember primal strips=good.  primal stICKs= ICK!  that makes it easy..

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Definitely get someone to write down, in Mandarin, "I am vegetarian; I do not eat meat, eggs, or milk" or something like that. (A sociology professor I had at the time offered to do that and I wish I had taken her up on the offer; thankfully I was always around people who spoke Mandarin)

Maybe include "fish" in that sentence since there is a lot of fish/fish flavorings in Asian food and not everyone thinks that fish is also meat.

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http://www.happycow.net/asia/china/

I know if you're with a group you may not be likely to go to a vegan/vegetarian restaurant, but just in case...

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going to China and I dont know what to eat!

well, not sure what, if any, food-items customs will let you bring in but you probably know what to eat; just don't know how to ask for it ...

learn some basic Mandarin before you go:

vegetables: SuCai

i don't eat meat: Wo Bu Chi Rou

and have someone explain & teach you the Chinese (Mandarin) way to order as a "Buddhist" (i.e., vegan) as opposed to struggling with just the vegetarian request ...

oh, and enjoy your trip! it's a beautiful country, culture, and language!

~ fr

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going to China and I dont know what to eat!

well, not sure what, if any, food-items customs will let you bring in but you probably know what to eat; just don't know how to ask for it ...

learn some basic Mandarin before you go:

vegetables: SuCai

i don't eat meat: Wo Bu Chi Rou

and have someone explain & teach you the Chinese (Mandarin) way to order as a "Buddhist" (i.e., vegan) as opposed to struggling with just the vegetarian request ...

oh, and enjoy your trip! it's a beautiful country, culture, and language!

~ fr

I agree! Learn simple Mandarin, the region is steeped in Buddhist tradition...
I have a friend in Singapore, she speaks Mandarin. I'll ask her. I am confident that you should find your vegan ways with ease! Enjoy!

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So I was wondering if you guys had any suggestions as to what to bring. Right now I am planning on lots of Cliff Bars and maybe some Raw Revolution stuff (although I have never tried it.)

And has anyone ever tried that primal strip stuff or any other vegan beef jerky type stuff

Fair warning, you need to check with the airline and make sure you can bring food with you.  I think packaged stuff is ok, but I would still double check.

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All good suggestions.  When we went we had an guide who would arrange meals and make sure that everything was supposively vegan for me. My husband did find something on line that stated that I was buddist and don't eat animals, but I know from the way my stomach reacted that some dishes we had when on our own had something in it.  We were able to go to a Walmart and I picked up some peanut butter and bread for sandwiches.  Plus the Ramen soups, but had to eat them plain with added veggies because our guide said they all had animal ingredients.

I wouldn't be too worried about milk. The only milk things I saw was with the cereals in the morning and the baby formulas.  Congee is a good suggestion, but watch what you put on top.  The hotels we stayed at catered to western adoptive parents so there were buffets in the morning with cereal, food, fries, and noodle dishes.

Oh, when we were in Nanchang and Beijing there was a little grocery stores right around the corner from the hotels. I know for sure the one in Nanchang had fresh veggies and I remember seeing a woman carrying some lynchee nuts around.  She was carrying them on a pole with a basket one each end, that's why I remember her so well.  So maybe check with the hotel staff when you check in to stock on the fresh fruit and veggies.

Oh, you probably know but don't drink the water and keep an eye on your face if you shave.  My husband shaved and didn't have any problems, but have heard of others getting infections from the water and a nik.

Have a good trip!
Also, tell your sister to invest in a Diva if she already doesn't have one if she could have her cycle while there.

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Thanks guys these are all great tips.

I know the airline is really strict as to what you can bring in you carry-on, so im not gonna take much in that. But I am gonna pack a lot of cliff bars, primal strips, Nanna's cookies, and whatever other good vegan snack I can find. I am also going to get some organic trail mix from the co-op and shrink wrap it, that will be good.

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Also, tell your sister to invest in a Diva if she already doesn't have one if she could have her cycle while there.

:-D
Only on VW...

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Also, tell your sister to invest in a Diva if she already doesn't have one if she could have her cycle while there.

I saw this and i didn't know what it was. I googled it...

bad idea
:-[

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Also, tell your sister to invest in a Diva if she already doesn't have one if she could have her cycle while there.

I saw this and i didn't know what it was. I googled it...

bad idea
:-[

In that case, I don't recommend reading the Diva Club thread, no matter how curious you are.  ::)

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Hey there,

I'm living in China, and not to put a downer on you, but don't be surprised if you get tricked into eating meat-based things. :'(  I've watched people making food and then they would tell someone it was vegetarian, when it really wasn't. If you're eating with Chinese omni's it's considered customary for you to pick around the meat, because everyone shares the same dish at the dinner table. You should be safe with Buddhist eateries, but tofu is a common food in this country (as in everyone eats it here) so it's often flavored with meat, so don't assume tofu=veggie.

Although as an interesting aside, I did once find vegetarian "dog meat" in the supermarket :o

I hope that you enjoy your visit. Don't forget to bring some really good diarrheal medicine!

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I got a response from my friend in Singapore, she recommended looking near temples for veg places to eat and keeping and eye out for http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/5069/characterd.jpg

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Oh, I just wanted to add a +1 to everyone who mentioned about being careful with the water. I took my own (this was pre-liquids ban, but I'm near certain you can take a supply with you if you pack it in your stored luggage). I'm near-certain I found some good bottled water once in China also.

This goes along with fruits as well--I have a general rule not to eat fresh fruits or veggies (unless you can peel them) in countries where the water supply is sketchy. I don't know if anyone has had luck with fresh fruits/veggies here (gardengirl, did you eat the fruits you saw being sold?)

I remember having beer with breakfast several mornings b/c I was skeptical of the provided water and juices (which I was pretty sure were made from concentrate.) They provided it, after all...

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I was in China a couple summers ago and didn't bring any food with me. Most restaurants have huge vegetable dish selections like braised cabbage, chili eggplant, and sticky fried potatoes. Also, don't be afraid to eat breakfast at a street vendor. They make yummy scallion pancakes and these sesame breads that are nutty and delicious. Oh! Yams wrapped in foil cooked over an open flame. I had some hep vaccinations before I went so I ate everything I wanted, including fruits. I bought lychees and peaches from people with baskets or carts. I'm not sure if it's vegan but stinky tofu is delicious too. Someone mentioned water and I would also suggest buying bottled water. You'll find good water in every store. In the dorms I usually stayed in, hot water was provided in the rooms and I drank it every day with no problems.

I say, don't bring any food. There's so much great food to eat. Wo xihuan Zhongguo!

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