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"Nothing Tastes as Good as Skinny Feels"

"Nothing Tastes as Good as Skinny Feels"

Kate Moss announced this questionable statement as her motto sometime last year; but I must wonder: "now.. is that really even true??" I think Moss may have destroyed her taste buds by smoking cigarettes (among other things.) She received a lot of flack about how, by her endorsing it, this motto will motivate young girls to become anorexic (I'm not so sure about this). Although..

The word "nothing" in her motto DOES imply that NO food is worth eating. This could easily suggest starving as the only means to be skinny (NOT true). Yet.. there is inspiration in imagining yourself happy and light-as-a-feather living your life. If you are eating hamburgers and french fries then, yes, such food probably isn't 'worth' it. But, GEEZE, you can eat healthy food wisely and be skinny! I submit that the motto should be: Nothing UNREASONABLY UNHEALTHY tastes as good as skinny feels.

But what do YOU think about her infamous quote? Is it inspiring? Disturbing?

That quote is not exclusive to Kate Moss.  My mother has used that as a mantra for decades.  But then again shes also been a member of TOPS  as a KOPS for about that long as well.  When you struggle to maintain a healthy weight its not just as easy as "eat healthy food wisely" for some people.  And while I would say its not a good quote for those with eating disorders it is quite helpful for those obese and trying to get healthy.

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And while I would say its not a good quote for those with eating disorders it is quite helpful for those obese and trying to get healthy.

Eh.  I think either way it exemplifies an unhealthy attitude towards food.  I've never heard it used out of an eating disordered context.  And it's disturbing.

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I don't find it bothersome at all.  I think it's geared towards people that lost a lot of weight and want to maintain it, or someone that feels healthy and robust at the weight they are.

Someone with an ED would probably find it distrubing, but considering there are about 100 million people overweight, I would think it's a fair statement to them. 

I realize there's a disproportionate number of persons with an ED here at VegWeb, but I think reading too much into it and latching on to one word is a part of their own illness and not the statement itself.

I'm sure when she says "nothing" she's mainly talking about junk food or temptation, meaning it feels good to resist temptation, not that it feels good to starve.

Of course, as always, I respect everyone's right to their own opinion.

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Eh.  I think either way it exemplifies an unhealthy attitude towards food.  I've never heard it used out of an eating disordered context.  And it's disturbing.

I think you may be looking at it from just one perspective.  I view it as my mother always said it... as a reason not to eat when bored, sad, angry or just because something was in the house.  My mother never meant this as a reason to not eat entirely, but as a way to help her remember that unconcious or emotional eating wasn't what she wanted to do. 

I think a print out of that quote has been on my mom's fridge since she was near 300lbs and is still there now when she is 165.  She works to maintain that weight every day, heathily.

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In the murky depths of anorexic behaviour, this aphorism was a stick I used to beat myself. It had never crossed my mind that it could be used as motivation for healthy weight-management. I guess looking back from the the perspective of off-and-on bulimia, I can sort of say 'well, anything is better than this,' but I'm still not sure I'll ever be comfortable with what has become a very harsh creed bandied about the scummy pro-ana underbelly of the interwebs.

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It really depends on who you are and how you see things. I know for a fact that a lot eating disorder sites and forums use it but it can also be used as (what someone else said) an inspiring mantra for someone who is trying to lose weight and doesn't have any eating disorder.

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Hey, if this works for you, then to each his own.  My problem with it is that its focus is on deprivation and skinniness, not so much health.  I agree with the underlying concept-- being thoughtful about what you choose to eat.  The phrasing is just very negative and reflective of our culture's twisted obsession of skinniness as the ultimate goal.

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hm, in other news i saw a commercial for the ipad that called it consecutively "thin, beautiful."  i threw up in my mouth a little.  maybe i'm over sensitive to the hidden messages in commercials, but this message wasn't hidden very well.  i know that i barely have two nickels to rub together, but if i ever get enough cash to buy an ipad, i think i'd actually rather just buy and etch-a-sketch and walk around all day acting like a pretentious asshole.  forget kate moss and steve jobs and all those other skeletal robots.  i'd just draw one message: be yourself.

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I think it depends on the person. I often  say this to myself when I think about eating one more french fry, cupcake, etc. I'm not anorexic at all but I recently lost nearly 40lbs and I want to keep it off. It was big accomplishment for me and its easy to fall back into the trap that made me gain the weight in the first place.

On the other hand, I could easily see how someone who is anorexic could use this motto to further her/himself into anorexia. But as well know anorexia (and bulimia) are diseases and this sort of "motto" is something that feeds this disease. But this isn't a cause to anorexia, that feeling, want and desire to be skinny are already in the person's mind and with or without this motto they are probably going to be anorexic anyway. This may just help or encourage that decision.

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hm, in other news i saw a commercial for the ipad that called it consecutively "thin, beautiful."  i threw up in my mouth a little.  maybe i'm over sensitive to the hidden messages in commercials, but this message wasn't hidden very well.  i know that i barely have two nickels to rub together, but if i ever get enough cash to buy an ipad, i think i'd actually rather just buy and etch-a-sketch and walk around all day acting like a pretentious asshole.  forget kate moss and steve jobs and all those other skeletal robots.  i'd just draw one message: be yourself.

I like you.

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makes me cringe.

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Yeah, it's not "nothing tastes as good as healthy feels". Not even "slim". It's "skinny", and whatever people think that word means, however often they use it as a compliment, it means <i>bony</i>. That is what it means.

Nothing tastes as good as self-deprivation and hunger feels!

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I think it depends on the person. I often  say this to myself when I think about eating one more french fry, cupcake, etc. I'm not anorexic at all but I recently lost nearly 40lbs and I want to keep it off. It was big accomplishment for me and its easy to fall back into the trap that made me gain the weight in the first place.

On the other hand, I could easily see how someone who is anorexic could use this motto to further her/himself into anorexia. But as well know anorexia (and bulimia) are diseases and this sort of "motto" is something that feeds this disease. But this isn't a cause to anorexia, that feeling, want and desire to be skinny are already in the person's mind and with or without this motto they are probably going to be anorexic anyway. This may just help or encourage that decision.

Boom. I'm going with you on this one. I used to say something similar when I was losing weight, to the effect of "this dessert, extra serving, etc. doesn't taste as good as losing weight will feel." It was really helpful for me, because it made me reassess the reasons I was eating. If I was eating out of boredom or sadness, it was easy to realize that behavior would contribute to weight gain. I in no way used it when I was eating my healthy, daily calories that contributed to my body's well-being. I think that people who have struggled with their weight at any point in their lives will see how this statement makes some sense. Also, I agree with the second paragraph that it could be used in a destruction manner, too.

Even today, 30 pounds lighter and an avid runner, when I reach for a brownie/cookie I ask myself: does this taste good enough to consume these calories and possibly gain weight if I do it often? I usually say yes and eat it, but at least I stop and take a breather, make a decision now. I also don't eat many store-bought things or pre-packaged things, because the answer is always a loud NO. I feel that's much healthier than just absently stuffing food into my face, like I did in the past.

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Proposed alternate quote: "When considering recreational vs. nutritive eating, ask yourself, 'how much extra time will I need to spend at the gym this week to balance caloric intake with activity level, and do I have the time to do that?"

'Skinny' can kiss my round rump.

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Yeah, it's not "nothing tastes as good as healthy feels". Not even "slim". It's "skinny", and whatever people think that word means, however often they use it as a compliment, it means <i>bony</i>. That is what it means.

Nothing tastes as good as self-deprivation and hunger feels!

I think the skinny part is the worst part of the quote. I watched a video of a guy who followed a workout program and said "Nothing tastes as good as looking like this!" which was strong and toned. I can agree with that.

Skinny feels pretty chilly to me. Also tired and cranky. I have a lot of bad feelings associated with feeling skinny.

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I like how food tastes. Quite a bit.

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When did "skinny" become a bad word?  Guess it's becoming like the word "fat".  Too PC to say either word???

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When did "skinny" become a bad word?  Guess it's becoming like the word "fat".  Too PC to say either word???

It's not really that, in my opinion. It's the context of the phrase. It's like eating does not equal skinny, so skinny=don't eat. This is a favorite phrase of an acquaintance of mine...

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Yeah, it's not "nothing tastes as good as healthy feels". Not even "slim". It's "skinny", and whatever people think that word means, however often they use it as a compliment, it means <i>bony</i>. That is what it means.

Nothing tastes as good as self-deprivation and hunger feels!

Yeah. I was just thinking that... I used to be thinner, it's not like I thought the whole time "woohoo! I'm lean!" Even when I lose weight I don't really feel better in any sort of way, whether emotional or physical. I do feel a whole lot better when I'm in the habit of running, no matter what weight I happen to be. Endorphins, the feeling of accomplishment, and the idea that I'm capable of doing something strenuous >>> fitting in some old jeans.
The quote itself might be good motivation for weight loss, but it's almost an unreasonable expectation. Unless the amount of weight you lose means you're no longer diabetic or at high risk for a heart attack, or it means you can go for a walk without getting winded (all those are health anyway), being thinner won't really change "you."

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When did "skinny" become a bad word?  Guess it's becoming like the word "fat".  Too PC to say either word???

It's not really that, in my opinion. It's the context of the phrase. It's like eating does not equal skinny, so skinny=don't eat. This is a favorite phrase of an acquaintance of mine...

Fair enough.  I understand.  But like a couple of people have pointed out the "context" of the phrase means different things to different people.  Dysfunctional eating and body image doesn't enter my mind.

Yeah, it's not "nothing tastes as good as healthy feels". Not even "slim". It's "skinny", and whatever people think that word means, however often they use it as a compliment, it means <i>bony</i>. That is what it means.

Nothing tastes as good as self-deprivation and hunger feels!

Yeah. I was just thinking that... I used to be thinner, it's not like I thought the whole time "woohoo! I'm lean!" Even when I lose weight I don't really feel better in any sort of way, whether emotional or physical. I do feel a whole lot better when I'm in the habit of running, no matter what weight I happen to be. Endorphins, the feeling of accomplishment, and the idea that I'm capable of doing something strenuous >>> fitting in some old jeans.
The quote itself might be good motivation for weight loss, but it's almost an unreasonable expectation. Unless the amount of weight you lose means you're no longer diabetic or at high risk for a heart attack, or it means you can go for a walk without getting winded (all those are health anyway), being thinner won't really change "you."

I 100% agree with you here.   "you" are "you" no matter how much you weigh.  That is an issue sometimes when people loose weight, they take away the bulk and are stuck with themselves and all their "issues".  

I've never been too horribly overweight but I've lost maybe 10 pounds from my highest weight.  Personally I don't think about it a lot because I still need to loose about 5 or 10 more, but when I do I do feel better about myself.  When someone compliments me, as someone did yesterday (it doesn't happen all that often at all) about my weight loss, I do feel good.  

I don't identify with the phrase because there's plenty of other things that feel better than being skinny, but it sure does feel better to me than being fat.  However, I also 100% agree that nothing feels as good as being healthy does.

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