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Eating organic eggs?

I'm slowly moving towards being a vegetarian and buying vegan replacements kitchen items like, butter ect. Would do you think about having your own organic feed chicken to produce eggs? Thoughts please? 

 

Nothing wrong with having a pet, even as non-conventional as a chicken... But why eat the eggs?  They aren't good for you and there are lots of easy substitutes when cooking.

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Yeah as I saw in a movie 101 reasons to go vegan. The guy referred to them pretty much as "hen periods"

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Eggs are very unhealthy so what is the point of having chickens just to produce them? You don't need to injest any dietary cholesterol, your body produces enough naturally on its own... Eggs are so high in cholesterol mine as well eat some bacon and wash it down with a glass of cow milk (neither of which i recommend).

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Eating eggs is not part of a vegan diet.

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Have to agree. You can sub with a lot of different things like applesauce and bananas for eggs. Cheese I found out you can make yourself using almonds or you can buy nutritional yeast which has folic acid and vitamin B12. 

 

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Egg are so great in cholestrerol levels my own as well eat some bread and clean it down with a cup of cow dairy products neither of which i suggest, which makes us better and also doing perform out...

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Um, no one's really answering the question. If she raises the chickens, they won't be mistreated, so is it okay then to eat their eggs? It seems like it might be okay, but I'm not sure the lifestyle that is best for a chicken, other than to be able to go outdoors some (right?).

In my experience, I started to no longer have an interest in eating eggs, even for omlets. Contrary to some previous comments, though, there's no sub for some things, like an egg soufle or a dutchbaby.  But I consider myself a foodie (food lover!) and am super satisfied with my food options on a vegan diet, esp. where I live (where there are a few good restaurants that cater to various diets).

Some people will disagree, but I believe that as long as our intentions are good and we act out of love, that any diet would be okay. My sister's friend is paleo, buys organic meats from a local farm, and seems conscious, not just eating whatever and pretending not to know where her food comes from. The truth is, as I heard someone say once, for every good thing we do, there are inevitably bad things that come with it. Even a plant-based diet calls for clearing area for crops, hurting animals by destroying their natural habitat. (But at least by not eating factory/mass-produced meats, etc. we're not supporting environmental pollution and animal cruelty.)

Good luck. I'm sure you'll do just fine.  

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If you live in an area that has enough room for some chickens, then by all means raise them! Organic eggs do taste better than store bought, plus you will have a pet. And when you decide to stop eating the eggs, then you can just either sell them or leave them be. Plus, they eat the bugs and things outside. Being concious with your choices is always better than to just pretend you don't know where your food comes from. :)

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Having a pet chicken in order to obtain eggs is a form of animal exploitation.  Not only because you are taking something from the animal that wasn't meant for you and is completely unnecessary in the human diet (also, chickens do on occasion eat their own unfertilized eggs for sustanence), but that chicken had to come from somewhere, and more than likely it was bred for reasons other than simply being a "pet".  So you would also be supporting and keeping an industry alive that breeds and exploits chickens for human purposes, whether it be on an organic farm or a factory farm (which proliferated because of the increased demand for chicken and eggs that an organic farm can't keep up with in the first place). 

Also, even if just keeping a chicken for a pet, you must consider that they have been bred and manipulated by humans for so long that they can not survive on their own or defend theirselves without our intervention (as compared to say a grouse that lives in the wild unexploited by humans and can defend itself).  This means that they are easy prey for fox, badgers, and other wild animals and also for domesticated cats and dogs.  So they will have to be kept confined to an area protected from these dangers.  They also need to be fed and cared for as any other pet and vet checked for illness etc as needed.  This is a big commitment that sadly a lot of well meaning pet owners can't handle.  Pets have to depend on their human owners/companions etc to survive, and if that human runs into financial difficulty, or has to move somewhere where they can't have animals, or ends up with health issues and can't care for that pet, the pet pays the price not the human (whether that be having to be uprooted to another home or sold off to who  knows what or put down).  There are a lot of considerations when taking on ownership of another life.  There is more to it than simply whether the individual animal is living in relative comfort. 

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