You are here

NVR - What are you reading right now? (Fiction or non-fiction)

I'm reading 'Raising Vegan Children in a Non-vegan World' by Erin Pavlina.
I'm curious what everyone else has their nose in at the moment!  :)

The Purity Myth by Jessica Valenti

Yes! What an awesome book! ;)

0 likes

The Purity Myth by Jessica Valenti

Yes! What an awesome book! ;)

:)

0 likes

The  Staturn Theory by Dave Talbot
The author formulates a new and interesting method of "proof" wherein common myths, legends and superstitions are used to derive facts about the past. He postulates that various religions and mythologies throughout history contain repetitive themes that indicate the configuration of our solar system was completely different 10,000 years ago. Specifically, Talbot uses the common myths of Christianity, Judaism, Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Mayans and Sumerians to “prove” that Saturn used to be our sun, or at the very least was as close or closer to Earth as the moon is today.

Later tonight.....Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler ....considers Wall Street's funding of the Nazi's Third Reich...will let you know how it turns out....

0 likes

The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

It's a bizarre and surreal novel about... hmm... I'm not talented enough to summarize this bad boy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind-Up_Bird_Chronicle

Wikipedia couldn't even give it a decent summary.  It's surrealism, and it's about so much on so many levels. It is engrossing, will always have you wondering "what's that supposed to mean?", and it's a lot of fun to read. I'm enjoying the heck out of it and can't wait for my next Murakami novel.

I also started Lady Chatterley's Lover while I was without the WUBC for a few days.  :-*

0 likes

The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

It's a bizarre and surreal novel about... hmm... I'm not talented enough to summarize this bad boy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind-Up_Bird_Chronicle

Wikipedia couldn't even give it a decent summary.  It's surrealism, and it's about so much on so many levels. It is engrossing, will always have you wondering "what's that supposed to mean?", and it's a lot of fun to read. I'm enjoying the heck out of it and can't wait for my next Murakami novel.

I also started Lady Chatterley's Lover while I was without the WUBC for a few days.  :-*

What do you think of Lady Chatterley's Lover? I read it this summer--and I'm not sure what I think of it.

0 likes

IdrilAsphodel, I read Lady Chatterly in college (1980) because of all the furore about it in the 60s. I remember that weird British judge kiboshing the whole proceeding with his attitude: "Is this something you would want your wife or your servants to read?" All he did was ensure the sales would skyrocket...anyway, I read it and found it meh. I mean, "dirty book?" OK so in 20 years things had changed a lot, but Anais Nin it ain't. It was OK, but more about the social class structure than anything. (OK, so yeah, I was hoping then that it would be at least prurient, but we must remember I went to college at 16.  ;D)

0 likes

IdrilAsphodel, I read Lady Chatterly in college (1980) because of all the furore about it in the 60s. I remember that weird British judge kiboshing the whole proceeding with his attitude: "Is this something you would want your wife or your servants to read?" All he did was ensure the sales would skyrocket...anyway, I read it and found it meh. I mean, "dirty book?" OK so in 20 years things had changed a lot, but Anais Nin it ain't. It was OK, but more about the social class structure than anything. (OK, so yeah, I was hoping then that it would be at least prurient, but we must remember I went to college at 16.  ;D)

That's fair, I thought of it pretty similarly. "That's it? Where's the dirty parts?" ha ha ha...
But I guess it was the one of the first of is kind, so it's worth reading in that regard.
Not a bad book, but I'm not all that attached to it either. It's a hit or miss kind of book.

0 likes

IdrilAsphodel, I read Lady Chatterly in college (1980) because of all the furore about it in the 60s. I remember that weird British judge kiboshing the whole proceeding with his attitude: "Is this something you would want your wife or your servants to read?" All he did was ensure the sales would skyrocket...anyway, I read it and found it meh. I mean, "dirty book?" OK so in 20 years things had changed a lot, but Anais Nin it ain't. It was OK, but more about the social class structure than anything. (OK, so yeah, I was hoping then that it would be at least prurient, but we must remember I went to college at 16.  ;D)

That's fair, I thought of it pretty similarly. "That's it? Where's the dirty parts?" ha ha ha...
But I guess it was the one of the first of is kind, so it's worth reading in that regard.
Not a bad book, but I'm not all that attached to it either. It's a hit or miss kind of book.

I personally loved it! The book really isn't about the dirty parts per se its more of a metaphor. Nature versus industrialism, etc...etc...  I won't go into of on my analysis of it. Haha. I'm such an English major.

0 likes

"So, and_it_spoke, what excuse do you have for not posting on VegWeb latley?"

Been readin'.

Bhagavad-Gita, Uddhava-Gita, "Essential Hinduism" by Stephen Rosen - currently reading "Hindu Scriptures" as editied by Dominic Goodall...

My world seems a bit larger now. :)

0 likes

We've missed you, AIS!! I was just thinking of you the other day, because I was rereading this and other book-related threads.

Welcome back!!

0 likes

The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

It's a bizarre and surreal novel about... hmm... I'm not talented enough to summarize this bad boy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind-Up_Bird_Chronicle

Wikipedia couldn't even give it a decent summary.  It's surrealism, and it's about so much on so many levels. It is engrossing, will always have you wondering "what's that supposed to mean?", and it's a lot of fun to read. I'm enjoying the heck out of it and can't wait for my next Murakami novel.

I also started Lady Chatterley's Lover while I was without the WUBC for a few days.  :-*

I love Murakami. Wind-up is my favorite. Have you read Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World yet?

0 likes

Just Kids by Patti Smith

0 likes

Just Kids by Patti Smith

was that good?  I want to read it

0 likes

Im in the middle of it, but so far I like it. Its mostly about her relationship and living with Robert Mapplethorpe in Brooklyn, finding themselves as artists. Ill let you know the final prognosis! ;)

0 likes

For work: The Woman Turned Bully
Midsummer Night's Dream
Edward II by Christopher Marlowe (which is probably the play that got him knifed in a "bar fight")

For fun: Thanks to my ebook reader I'm on a Nero Wolfe binge. Currently reading The Black Mountain. Atypical because they go to Europe. Funny how Archie Goodwin was a lot more bumptious and racist in the early 60s than before and after.

0 likes

For work: The Woman Turned Bully
Midsummer Night's Dream
Edward II by Christopher Marlowe (which is probably the play that got him knifed in a "bar fight")

For fun: Thanks to my ebook reader I'm on a Nero Wolfe binge. Currently reading The Black Mountain. Atypical because they go to Europe. Funny how Archie Goodwin was a lot more bumptious and racist in the early 60s than before and after.

I read Edward II last semester, and then we watched the Derek Jarman film of the same title. I found the play much more enjoyable, partially because there wasn't any visualization of the actual death scene. (It was so brutal).
But I thought C. Marlowe died because he had atheist views during a time where that was just unheard of? I don't remember his death being over any of his plays.

0 likes

Marlowe was a soldier, diplomat, spy, playwright...and homosexual at a time when that meant death. He also portrays Edward as a homosexual in his play. The language is pretty overt, all that Ganymede and Hylas stuff. He was stabbed in a barroom dispute, supposedly over the bill, but it's generally thought that the dispute was provoked to give someone an excuse to knife him. He had become inconvenient in many ways, but atheism was the least of his problems.

It's a shame because I feel sure if he'd lived he might have surpassed Shakespeare. Many scenes of The Merchant of Venice resonate heavily with the language of Marlowe's Jew of Malta.

0 likes

Also reading:
Flags of Our Fathers
No Certain Rest
Enrique's Journey
You Better Not Cry

The first two are for one of my classes, and extremely boring and war oriented. Enrique is about a boy's struggle to reunite with his family. YBNC is the last thing Augusten Burroughs has written, who I love. It's a collection of christmas-themed stories from his life. I finished it today and while I like it, I think I was expecting a little more. The first majority of the stories are lighthearted and fun, then the last two are about one of his struggling relationships and were written in a much different tone than the others. But if you're a Burroughs fan, read it.

0 likes

Marlowe was a soldier, diplomat, spy, playwright...and homosexual at a time when that meant death. He also portrays Edward as a homosexual in his play. The language is pretty overt, all that Ganymede and Hylas stuff. He was stabbed in a barroom dispute, supposedly over the bill, but it's generally thought that the dispute was provoked to give someone an excuse to knife him. He had become inconvenient in many ways, but atheism was the least of his problems.

It's a shame because I feel sure if he'd lived he might have surpassed Shakespeare. Many scenes of The Merchant of Venice resonate heavily with the language of Marlowe's Jew of Malta.

Yes, it is a shame.
Hmm, that's a really interesting idea about the stabbing. I'm going to have to do some reading....

0 likes

Marlowe was a soldier, diplomat, spy, playwright...and homosexual at a time when that meant death. He also portrays Edward as a homosexual in his play. The language is pretty overt, all that Ganymede and Hylas stuff. He was stabbed in a barroom dispute, supposedly over the bill, but it's generally thought that the dispute was provoked to give someone an excuse to knife him. He had become inconvenient in many ways, but atheism was the least of his problems.

It's a shame because I feel sure if he'd lived he might have surpassed Shakespeare. Many scenes of The Merchant of Venice resonate heavily with the language of Marlowe's Jew of Malta.

Yes, it is a shame.
Hmm, that's a really interesting idea about the stabbing. I'm going to have to do some reading....

OK, I finished Edward II. IdrilAsphodel, did this play seem kind of "cut short" to you? I mean, yeah, it's a tragedy, the baddies have to pay with their lives etc. but I got the impression that he kind of rushed through the ending. The part about putting the table on Edward and stamping on it to kill him made me laugh. Why not just smother him with a pillow? He had one right there! I need to check historical stuff and see what actually happened to Edward Plantagenet....

0 likes

Pages

Log in or register to post comments