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NVR - What are you reading right now? (Fiction or non-fiction)

I'm reading 'Raising Vegan Children in a Non-vegan World' by Erin Pavlina.
I'm curious what everyone else has their nose in at the moment!  :)

Marlowe was a soldier, diplomat, spy, playwright...and homosexual at a time when that meant death. He also portrays Edward as a homosexual in his play. The language is pretty overt, all that Ganymede and Hylas stuff. He was stabbed in a barroom dispute, supposedly over the bill, but it's generally thought that the dispute was provoked to give someone an excuse to knife him. He had become inconvenient in many ways, but atheism was the least of his problems.

It's a shame because I feel sure if he'd lived he might have surpassed Shakespeare. Many scenes of The Merchant of Venice resonate heavily with the language of Marlowe's Jew of Malta.

Yes, it is a shame.
Hmm, that's a really interesting idea about the stabbing. I'm going to have to do some reading....

OK, I finished Edward II. IdrilAsphodel, did this play seem kind of "cut short" to you? I mean, yeah, it's a tragedy, the baddies have to pay with their lives etc. but I got the impression that he kind of rushed through the ending. The part about putting the table on Edward and stamping on it to kill him made me laugh. Why not just smother him with a pillow? He had one right there! I need to check historical stuff and see what actually happened to Edward Plantagenet....

I also thought it was cut short a bit, though my original reading of it, I thought it was a sort of stand in for the violence of Edward's death--stamping out quickly the king, and then suddenly the entire plot disappears as well (for the most part). I remember that I didn't like the way it ended very much, with the son taking control and getting the bad guys out of power--but maybe that's because of the empathy I had for Edward.
Have you seen Derek Jarman's film of Edward II? We watched it in conjunction with the play. I found I liked the play better after I watched the film--partially because I didn't like Marlowe's writing style much at all.
I believe Edward did die an excruciatingly painful death, as they portrayed in the play. What an awful way to die.

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Well, yeah, there was "pressing", aka "the question." When a person was "pressed" or "put to the question" it meant that they put a heavy oak plank or door on top`of you and then piled huge heavy stones on it until you either a) confessed or b) were crushed to death, whichever came first. It's just the way the assassin put it that gave me the giggles.

NTS: Find Derek Jarman film.  The Eng Lit dept here is obssessed with Jacobean drama. Have you seen Eddie Izzard and Derek Jacoby in "The Revenger's Tragedy"? Seriously surreal.

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Well, yeah, there was "pressing", aka "the question." When a person was "pressed" or "put to the question" it meant that they put a heavy oak plank or door on top`of you and then piled huge heavy stones on it until you either a) confessed or b) were crushed to death, whichever came first. It's just the way the assassin put it that gave me the giggles.

NTS: Find Derek Jarman film.  The Eng Lit dept here is obssessed with Jacobean drama. Have you seen Eddie Izzard and Derek Jacoby in "The Revenger's Tragedy"? Seriously surreal.

Wait, Eddie Izzard? I have to see that!

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Um, yeah...so Edward II had a much nastier death than just "pressing." They do say his torturers put a red-hot poker up his...um, yeah. And then strangled him. Nice. Sure makes the haters seem more mature than him, dunnit?  :o

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Um, yeah...so Edward II had a much nastier death than just "pressing." They do say his torturers put a red-hot poker up his...um, yeah. And then strangled him. Nice. Sure makes the haters seem more mature than him, dunnit?  :o

Yeah, that's what I had read. I had never heard of the "pressing"--which sounds awful enough.
When watching the Derek Jarman film on Edward II, I usually skip that scene. :(

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Currently reading George Macdonald's "Sir Gibbie." It gets good when Gibbie leaves the town and Macdonald stops preaching about the evils of drink. Not that I don't recognise them...but they make dreary reading.

Also, "The Second Confession" by Rex Stout.

Next up: Elizabeth and Her German Garden. I never got the chance to finish this so I'm excited to have access again.

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Currently reading The End of the Affair by Graham Greene. This is a great book!

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Listening to the Count of Monte Cristo on tape--helps me stay on track in the studio.
Also chugging away (still) through a book called "History of the German Language". I got it at the free bookstore, and it sounds dry, but it's actually hugely fascinating. Love it.

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Currently reading The End of the Affair by Graham Greene. This is a great book!

There's a movie somewhere with Julianne Moore in it. Recommend it.

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I'm reading The Disappearing Spoon. It's about the periodic table. Right now I'm at the beginning, and I'm skipping a lot of the basic info (I have a chem background), but I've peeked ahead and it's looking pretty good. It's an easy, fun read, and I can still convince myself I'm learning something!

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I'm probably going to start reading "Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America" by Matt Taibbi

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Currently reading The End of the Affair by Graham Greene. This is a great book!

There's a movie somewhere with Julianne Moore in it. Recommend it.

Saw the movie since you recommended it and I liked it =)

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just finished the continuum concept. good.

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Naked by David Sedaris.  Really funny, as expected.

I've always enjoyed film adaptations of Graham Greene books, but I have yet to read one.

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Clouds of Witness (Lord Peter Wimsey) by Dorothy L. Sayers. Still trudging through "Sir Gibbie" off and on. I now understand why they abridged his work for modern libraries...can you say "digressions and tangents that add nothing to the story?"

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Lousia May Alcott's Hospital Sketches. Her style is totally different to her children's books, much less saccherine and very amusing. Maybe that's why the book wasn't well-recieved when it came out...women were supposed to be "angels" in those days in that situation, and she pokes sly fun at the idea.

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Oooh Hospital Sketches sounds interesting. I used to be obsessed with Louisa May Alcott. I visited her home and everything.

I haven't been reading as much lately for some reason. Just haven't gotten really into the books I've started. But I am now reading The Chrysalids, by John Wyndham. It's a post-apocalyptic novel about a fundamentalist Christian society's dealings with human mutations and the young protaganist who tries to come to terms with his own difference.
It's SO GOOD!

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Oooh Hospital Sketches sounds interesting. I used to be obsessed with Louisa May Alcott. I visited her home and everything.

Everything she ever wrote, including the penny dreadfuls, is available on Gutenberg for free.

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Gutenberg is full of treasures. I am currently reading Brillat-Savarin's Physiology of Taste. It's full of little side-notes and anecdotes. I had no idea that he lived in Boston before the Revolutionary War for a few years, teaching French and playing the violin in the Park Theatre orchestra. He liked the Americans very much, though what he thought of their cooking I haven't found out yet.

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Essence and Alchemy by Thomas G. Aylesworth

Someone mentioned a religion based on alchemy and it got me interested in what it is so I ordered over 10 books on it from my library. It's actually quite interesting reading about so many theories and how people actually believe in this type of stuff.

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