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NVR - What are you reading right now? (Fiction or non-fiction)

I'm reading 'Raising Vegan Children in a Non-vegan World' by Erin Pavlina.
I'm curious what everyone else has their nose in at the moment!  :)

Just finished the first volume of The Sunday Philosophy Club and am totally disappointed. It is the dullest book I've read in a long time! I can hardly believe this is the same author who writes such lively stuff in the Precious Romotswe novels. In the first place, the Sunday Philosophy Club never convenes; you never hear anything about the members. I'm hardly surprised, since the president is a professional philosopher (how much does that pay, anyway?) who never does anything. Oh, she walks into town to have coffee, she goes to the occasional concert...but not even watching someone fall from a great height to their death can distract her from her arcane moral "dilemmas" (ie matters that any thinking human being with an ounce of common sense is built to resolve without a second thought on the basis of right and wrong). There is a tiny buildup of 2 possible baddies and a tiny bit of tension...but it never comes to anything. The end is like he got bored with it and just patched on an ending. I'm not surprised.

If this had been the first of Alexander McCall's books I'd ever picked up, I would never have bothered to read anything else with his name on it. I know he is a member of several committees on bioethics, but this reads like a laboured effort to turn every aspect of his life to money on the book market.

Nought point five on a scale of 1-10, with 1 being the lowest.

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i'm in the middle of reading "Eating Animals" by jonathan safran foer. it's really great so far.

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Excitotoxins: The Taste that Kills by Russell Blaylock

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Finishing the Candleford Trilogy: Lark Rise, Over to Candleford, Candleford Green.
No similarity to the ITV series until you get to volume 3. Not a bad read though.

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The Power by Rhonda Bynre ..... This will be my first positive-thinking book. I'm scared. Haha!

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I just looked up Unbroken because I read in People that Jimmy Fallon said it was amazing.  I just got a kindle recently, and I'm on a book reading spree!

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yeah.
it's supposed to be really good...

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I'm working on three books right now, actually....

1) How To See Yourself as You Really Are by HH The Dalai Lama

2) Ruling Your World by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche

3) A People's History of the United States: 1492-Present by Howard Zinn

I recommend all of these for a bit of thoughtful reading.

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Fortunata y Jacinta by Benito Perez Galdos (for myself)
Trafalgar (of the Episodios Nacionales, same author) reading aloud to DH who can't read or watch TV just now.

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The Wind is My Mother by Bear Heart
On The Prowl by Patricia Briggs, et. al.
Healthy at 100 by John Robbins

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I'm starting to brush up for my English Lit GRE.

Just finished Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Reading:

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Women's Indian Captivity Narratives

Where Angels Fear to Tread

and as a guilty pleasure:

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

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Ahhh dear Sir Gawain. Now there was a conflicted man. He loved and honoured Arthur as his uncle and his king, but at the same time he hated him because really Gawain's mother, Morgause, should have been queen instead of her little bastard half-brother.
Gawain reminds me of St Peter in a way...always rushing into things half-thought-out. The Green Knight is a case in point. Like Phyllis in "The Railway Children," Gawain meant extremely well.
Don't forget the importance of "alliteration's artful aid" and the "bob and wheel" at the end of a passage, and you'll be fine.

(Can you tell I love OE Lit?)

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All right - I know we've got some Lovecraft lovers around here. I just finished Lovecraft Unbound, and it is hands down the best Lovecraft-inspired anthology I have read in a long time... and I've suffered thought enough of them. (Cthulu 2000, anyone? Oi.)

Right now, I'm reading 'Chants of a Lifetime' by Krishna Das. I will admit to finding it inspiring.

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Ahhh dear Sir Gawain. Now there was a conflicted man. He loved and honoured Arthur as his uncle and his king, but at the same time he hated him because really Gawain's mother, Morgause, should have been queen instead of her little bastard half-brother.
Gawain reminds me of St Peter in a way...always rushing into things half-thought-out. The Green Knight is a case in point. Like Phyllis in "The Railway Children," Gawain meant extremely well.
Don't forget the importance of "alliteration's artful aid" and the "bob and wheel" at the end of a passage, and you'll be fine.

(Can you tell I love OE Lit?)

Those are interesting things Yabbit, I remeber spending a lot of time studying Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and discussing how in the beginning of this story King Artuhur and his court came across as very young and inexperienced (and even foolish), yet at the end when Gawain is shamed and they all wear the badge to share that with him they are matured.  It was interesting. (And our professor made us read it aloud in Old English, which was super embarrassing)....

I have been reading some great books this summer, taking some free reading time on my break between school ending and school starting with a new program in the fall (I always feel too guilty to read for "pleasure" when I am in school and negelecting all my assigned readings)....

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks ....which is the story of Henrietta Lacks and her family (the African Americain woman whose cells were taken as the first immortal cells, (known as HeLA cells), that they used to study and make vaccines with across the world, without her or her family's consent or knowledge).

The Crowning Glory of Calla Lilly Ponder---this is a WONDERFUL book! Its by the author of Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, which I loved as well.  It is similar in the ways of telling a beautiful story about a young girl's mystical, enchanted childhood growning up in the Lousisana into becoming a woman.  I cried like 5 times (happy and sad tears).

The White Queen---
The Constant Princess---
The Red Queen  ---all by Phillipa Gregory, she writes historical fiction novels, (author of The other Boylan Girl) and I really like them all! Sadly, I have learned/retained more English History from her books than from school....

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Griftopia by Matt Taibbi

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My MIL recently gave me The Help, and I have been loving it! Almost finished most of it in one day, because I don't want to put it down!

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Thanks to Yabba Cadabra's guidance, have gotten some stuff off of Project Gutenberg Australia.

A coupla short stories by Anton Chekhov (a master imo). Most notably:

The Kiss

About a naive Russian soldier's brief accidental encounter with a female at a General's party. Fantastic!, and yet sorta lame. I don't understand why I cannot seem to stop reading a Chekhov story when I start. It is like every line carries you, like it has wings and claws into your shoulders softly and carries you away without your direct consent. So much better than any modern fiction I have tried. So sad he died at 43, would easily surpased his buddy Tolstoy in greatness.

How come Russians in general blow away other countries for literary prowess?

Also, E. A. Poe's The Sphynx, which I didn't remember reading before, until I was right at the end. Disappointed. Not Poe's finest by far.

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I was on the library's computer looking for Jules Verne books for my son when I stumbled across The Dreams our Stuff is Made of subtitled How Science fiction conquered the world  I am finding it very thought provoking and insightful at making the connections between fiction and what actually happens in history.

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Thanks to Yabba Cadabra's guidance, have gotten some stuff off of Project Gutenberg Australia.

A coupla short stories by Anton Chekhov (a master imo). Most notably:

The Kiss

About a naive Russian soldier's brief accidental encounter with a female at a General's party. Fantastic!, and yet sorta lame. I don't understand why I cannot seem to stop reading a Chekhov story when I start. It is like every line carries you, like it has wings and claws into your shoulders softly and carries you away without your direct consent. So much better than any modern fiction I have tried. So sad he died at 43, would easily surpased his buddy Tolstoy in greatness.

How come Russians in general blow away other countries for literary prowess?

YES. Chekov is a real spellbinder. He can make the most pedestrian subjects un-put-downable. Which is actually an enormous tribute to his translators, also.
Turgenyev, however, is kind of a Chekov wannabee IMO.
Charlie-my-boy, if you can find the DVD of Vanya on 42nd Street I think you'd like it. Wallace Shawn plays Vanya, and "Fraiser's dad" plays the professor. Along with a very young Julianne Moore.

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