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NVR - What are you reading right now? (Fiction or non-fiction)

I'm reading 'Raising Vegan Children in a Non-vegan World' by Erin Pavlina.
I'm curious what everyone else has their nose in at the moment!  :)

I'm wanting to re-read Bodies by (feminist) Susie Orbach. It's been a few years since I've read it but it was such a powerful book. Maybe I should wait until I start reading before I post here? Nahhh..

For those interested - here are some thoughts from Publishers Weekly:

Noted psychoanalyst and feminist thinker Orbach, author of The Impossibility of Sex, Fat is a Feminist Issue and once-counselor to Princess Diana, takes a critical look at the modern notion that "biology need no longer be destiny." Rather than liberating individuals, Orbach contends that this has only made the body another competitive realm for personal achievement: "The individual is now deemed accountable for his or her body and judged by it."

This "obsessive cultural focus" leads to a host of psychological problems, making "body anxiety" as fundamental a threat to the modern psyche as emotional anxiety (leading to self harm, obesity, anorexia, etc.). Body anxiety has also driven the beauty industry to become a $160 billion, fully-globalized industry with customers from the U.S., U.K. and other advanced sector economies traveling abroad for discount reconstruction (Nose jobs in Tehran, eye surgery in Asia).

Orbach provides a rich, nuanced context for the present moment, looking through time and across cultures at (among other topics) child rearing regimes, body-shaping techniques (tattoos, bound feet) and standard mechanical activities like walking. Orbach makes a powerful case that, because people today have been seduced by a one-size-fits all Western (celebrity) body image, we deprive ourselves-body, mind and soul-of the body's most simple pleasures and rewards, up to and including sexual intimacy.

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I'm wanting to re-read Bodies by (feminist) Susie Orbach. It's been a few years since I've read it but it was such a powerful book. Maybe I should wait until I start reading before I post here? Nahhh..

For those interested - here are some thoughts from Publishers Weekly:

Noted psychoanalyst and feminist thinker Orbach, author of The Impossibility of Sex, Fat is a Feminist Issue and once-counselor to Princess Diana, takes a critical look at the modern notion that "biology need no longer be destiny." Rather than liberating individuals, Orbach contends that this has only made the body another competitive realm for personal achievement: "The individual is now deemed accountable for his or her body and judged by it."

This "obsessive cultural focus" leads to a host of psychological problems, making "body anxiety" as fundamental a threat to the modern psyche as emotional anxiety (leading to self harm, obesity, anorexia, etc.). Body anxiety has also driven the beauty industry to become a $160 billion, fully-globalized industry with customers from the U.S., U.K. and other advanced sector economies traveling abroad for discount reconstruction (Nose jobs in Tehran, eye surgery in Asia).

Orbach provides a rich, nuanced context for the present moment, looking through time and across cultures at (among other topics) child rearing regimes, body-shaping techniques (tattoos, bound feet) and standard mechanical activities like walking. Orbach makes a powerful case that, because people today have been seduced by a one-size-fits all Western (celebrity) body image, we deprive ourselves-body, mind and soul-of the body's most simple pleasures and rewards, up to and including sexual intimacy.

aww hell yes to all this.
I still haven't read this one. Clearly I need to.

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Working my way through Isaiah Berlin. He's slow going, but amazing--basically his ideas concerning liberalism is total genius and spot on.
Finished "Political Ideas in the 20th Century"--excellent.
Working on "Two Notions of Liberty" at the moment. Great, great stuff.

Also started "A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory", which, I know a great deal about but I figured I'd solidify this further.
and also reading bits and pieces out of "A Field Guide to Getting Lost", which I'm having problems with the poetic/academic style shiftings throughout the piece.

I'm looking forward to reading some film theory books after this, and then gonna do some research on matriarchal societies (also books on radical political theory, just finished the Communist Manifesto again and I forgot how much I loved it when I was a teenager).

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aww hell yes to all this.
I still haven't read this one. Clearly I need to.

Duh!! Read it! I'd send you my copy but I sold it to move to Oregon last year. I'm on the hunt for another copy. It's a great book about how we sometimes turn our own bodies against ourselves and we disconnect. During that disconnection, we fall victim to false hope and genuine anxiety.

Do you still have that book I sent you?

I've got Communist Manifesto on my list but I've yet to read it. Nice picks on the liberalism and "Political Ideas".

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aww hell yes to all this.
I still haven't read this one. Clearly I need to.

Duh!! Read it! I'd send you my copy but I sold it to move to Oregon last year. I'm on the hunt for another copy. It's a great book about how we sometimes turn our own bodies against ourselves and we disconnect. During that disconnection, we fall victim to false hope and genuine anxiety.

Do you still have that book I sent you?

I've got Communist Manifesto on my list but I've yet to read it. Nice picks on the liberalism and "Political Ideas".

Yeah, "Against Happiness"?

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One Grave at a Time - Jeaniene Frost
Limitless Mind: a guide to remote viewing and transformation of consciousness - Russell Targ

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The Katherine Mansfield Notebooks. The complete, huge, heavy edition in Paperback, of all things! For the first time I took the trouble to read the Preface, and discovered that KM was related to Elisabeth von Arnim, best known for "Elisabeth and her German Garden." At first I was amazed by this--then I saw the resemblance in their writing. I am inordinately pleased by this discovery and since I have no one to share it with I will post it here. No one cares, I know. Never mind.

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Drift by Rachel Maddow.

Did I mention I get to meet her in 2 weeks?!?!?! She's been my celesbian crush for 8 years!!! :D

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I'm currently reading the "Emily" books by LM Montgomery (Emily of New Moon, Emily Climbs and Emily's Quest.). They're much more autobiographical and realistic than the idealised "Anne books". TBH Anne Shirley was a little too good-to-be-true sometimes for my taste. Emily is much more believable nowadays, but I can see why they would have been less popular when published in the 1920s.

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Montgomery. Such an awesome name.

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I'm always working on several texts at once.
Working on a book of essays by Susan Sontag. I HIGHLY suggest her, she's excellent, especially her Notes on Camp, despite the fact that I think camp is a bit more complicated than she writes about.
Also working on a biography of Judy Chicago. Man, I so totally get off to the idea of poor artists living in the city and having no money for food, etc (It's probably a coping mechanism, cause how true to my life is that?). ;)

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1Q84.  Can I be honest and say, I am halfway through and it feels like a total chore.  I don't care about the characters, an of them, the main characters are both very much unloveable in not a good way, and I think the author is a little misogynistic in his treatment of women and creepy in the way he treats attraction between a 17 yar old and a 30-something.  Also, very little happens.  I never abandon books halfway through but I'm thinking I need a new book.

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I got curious and searched for cookbooks on Gutenberg. I found "The Forme of Cury", a cookbook from the reign of Edward II (Middle Ages). Nothing to do with curry as we know it. Cury was an old term for cooking, food prep in general etc. Kind of like the Mrs Beeton of the Dark Ages. It's interesting, even though they ate some weird stuff back then. I'm sure they'd say the same of what we eat today!! I mean...come on...cheez curls? ;D

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Currently reading The Time of My Life, the wartime diaries of Joyce Grenfell.
Also Emily Climbs by L M Montgomery. It seems to be a reworking and combining of Anne of the Island and Anne of Windy Poplars. But Emily is a more likeable, human and believable character than the idealised Anne.

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Still working on the Sontag (it's coming slowly) "Against Interpretation: And other Essays"
as well as "Rat Girl", written by one of the Throwing Muses. It's a memoir but it's about as close to fiction as I dare tread. (Not much a fan of fiction, which is strange for an painter dealing with abstraction to be obsessed with reality).
Also just borrowed "Why are Faggots so Afraid of Faggots?" from a friend. Essays on hegemonic masculinity, gay bashing, and other queer stuff.
OH
And I just read through "Dirty Blonde: The Diary of Courtney Love". Gotta say this is my favorite book I've read in a while, but you gotta be a Courtney fan to appreciate it fully, otherwise it reads kind of strange.

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Currently reading several books at once, as usual. Aloud to DH, reading "Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman!" and enjoying it.
To myself, currently reading "Little Fuzzy" by H Beam Piper which I found on Gutenberg. It is now classed as "children's fiction" though it was adult sci-fi/environmental issues when it came out. Good read.
Also "Tom Brown at Oxford" basically because it's there.

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Blood Cross (Faith Hunter) and Eat to Live (Joel Fuhrman)

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I'm currently reading:

"The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything" by Ken Robinson, PhD. I saw this guy speak on TED.com and YouTube. He spoke to my core belief system about our society and the education system. I decided to pick up his book and it is amazing!

I've started these books but put them on hold for a wee bit:

"Drift" by Rachel Maddow. Did I tell you I met her??????!!!!! I'm in love with this woman. :D

"Living As A River" by Bodhipaksa. A book with some great life lessons that are loosely rooted in Buddhism.

"The Question Behind The Question" by John G. Miller. A book my manager wants me to read. I don't know about this one. It is probably littered with manager/staff relations shit.

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We have a word for books like that, Josh. "Verborrhea." Thinkaboudit.

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HAHAHAHA!!! Yes!! That's totally what it is!

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