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Haluski a.k.a. "Cabbage and Noodles"

What you need: 

1 cabbage
1 lb. of noodles
1/2 to 3/4 cups of vegan margarine (Earth Balance! Woo!)
salt & pepper

What you do: 

This is a very simple version of an Eastern European dish that is also very popular around Pittsburgh. My family simply called it "Cabbage & Noodles" most of the time for obvious reasons.
Cut cabbage in half and cut out the core. Cut each half into long, thin-ish strips.
Put cabbage strips in a large pot along with the margarine over medium heat. Use 1/2 to 3/4 cups margarine (1 to 1 1/2 sticks) depending on how big your cabbage is. Let the cabbage and margarine simmer until cabbage is wilted and yellow.
While cabbage is simmering, boil your pound of noodles (I like using colored rotini, but just about any noodle will do.)
When both cabbage and noodles are done, drain the noodles and mix them with the cabbage. Stir.
Add as much salt and pepper as you desire.
This is obviously not the healthiest dish, but if you're from the "Pixburgh" area, it's a great, easy comfort food. It's also easy to add other ingredients...so have fun with it!

Preparation Time: 
15-30 minutes
Cooking Time: 
Servings: 
6
Recipe Category: 

SO HOW'D IT GO?

i'm from the pittsburgh area too! around "the pittsburgh mills area". pierogies is one of the things that i've missed as becoming a vegan. this haluski looks really good. i'll have to make it whenever i get some cabbage.

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i hail from northest pa - scranton/wilkes-barre....very big on polish food- my family puts alot of thin sliced white onions in their haluski. its a staple at all the bazaars, and since i have moved i make it alot to remind me of home.

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I remember eating this at football games at Norwin High School (near Pittsburgh)!

Good stuff!

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  I always add extra pepper to mine ;)

Some accuse this dish of being nothing but a vehicle for pepper. Or Tabasco.

I will not deny these accusations. I'm so glad I'm making this tonight.

Oops. Off to clean up a puddle of drool...

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My friend's grandfather is from Hungary and he brought this recipe with him-in his honor, we call it "papa pasta"! I have been in love with it since first taste. However, their version is slightly different:  they use bowtie noodles, boil their cabbage in water for 1 hr. + and they add generous amount of veg. oil instead of margerine. I always add extra pepper to mine ;)

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You can bet I'll be making this recipe.  I grew up in Pittsburgh and am Polish.  I now  live in northern California and have been vegan for 2 years now (75lbs. lighter)  Sometimes I crave the old Pittsburgh style of cooking.  Tofurky kielbasi and pierogis anyone? 

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This is also a Polish dish and I come from a Polish family.  I also live in Pittsburgh, so I know exactly where you're coming from when you talk about this dish being common in Pittsburgh.  My aunt always serves it for Easter.  Are you from Pittsburgh, too? What a small world!! 

Just outside of the 'burgh. A city called Beaver Falls. This recipe was always around it seems. Probably due to the fact that there's not much cost or effort to it!

When I came here to Ohio, and made it for my wife she thought I was nuts. "That sounds just... wrong," I remember her saying. But once she had it, she was hooked. And during her pregnancy, she CRAVED it.

So are you in Pittsbugh proper, or other parts of PA?

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This is also a Polish dish and I come from a Polish family.  I also live in Pittsburgh, so I know exactly where you're coming from when you talk about this dish being common in Pittsburgh.  My aunt always serves it for Easter.  Are you from Pittsburgh, too? What a small world!! 

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